Coconut fiber added to planter soil, and soil added to Garden Tower

Letter C red and bold
coconut

fiber

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Letter A red with white stitching
added

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Letter R bold red
relatively

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Letter E red with white stitching
easy

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Coir is a natural fiber extracted from the husk of coconut and used in products such as floor mats, doormats, brushes, mattresses, etc. Coir is the fibrous material found between the hard, internal shell and the outer coat of a coconut.

Coconut Coir is a 100-percent natural by-product of harvesting coconut. Coir consists of the coarse fibers extracted from the husk on the outer shell of a coconut. Because of its superior water holding capacity, excellent air space and drainage, coir is a useful soil amendment for potted plants, containers and gardens. Coir is a sustainable alternative to peat moss – it does not produce the same environmental damage caused by peat mining and grows quickly for harvest. In addition, coir is easier to hydrate and lasts longer in soil than peat moss. Coir’s neutral pH of 5.8–6.8 allows it to efficiently release nutrients to plant roots and reduces the need to use dolomite lime in the garden. How to use Coir ? When used in sandy soils, coir helps to keep nutrients and moisture close to plant roots instead of washing away. When used in clay soils, coir helps to break up hard-packed earth and move nutrients and moisture through the soil. By adding one part coir to two parts soil or potting mix containing compost, you can make a perfect growing medium for potted plants or an outdoor garden or raised bed. Coir comes compressed into bricks, which makes for easy, convenient storage. Add water and soak your brick for at least 1 hour before using it. A fully-hydrated brick can hold eight to ten times its volume in water. The final volume of the expanded coir depends on the amount of water used to constitute it. By maintaining a consistent level of moisture and air and by being naturally disease and weed free, coir creates a perfect environment for starting seeds and cuttings and can be used as a seed-starting medium. Improve your soil structure and water-holding capacity with 100-percent natural Coconut Coir today.

What Are the Benefits of Coconut Coir in the Garden?

Earth-Friendly Coco Coir for Composting, Planting and More!

Readi-SoilLorraine here with a personal note: I read in Garden Training Project that the soil should be “light and fluffy.” The excellent (imho) natural planter soil from Tractor Supply is  very heavy. So (wide awake in the middle of the night 😦 ) I suddenly thought of coconut fiber. (I used it in another lifetime. 🙂 )Gardening-For-Dummies-palm-siz-5761159

Below is an interesting article–mainly for in-the-ground–but some helpful information “for Dummies.” Click on How to….

How to Prepare Garden Soil for Planting

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The web site where I ordered the coir bricks. The box arrived but the weather was miserable so unopened for several days. Today (1/12/16) was absolutely perfect by mid-day. Freezing temperatures overnight but I was working (on this project), in the sunshine, and well over seventy-five degrees.

Coir bricksPackage arrives

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Getting ready to soak coirOne brick soaking

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Peat moss and planter soil added to coirTub of mixture

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Three trays full (1)Three trays full (2)

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Covered against too much rainSeed planting potsFifty-four, two-inch biodegradable pots, one “smart grow seed starter kit” and two packs of twenty-four wooden markers.

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Freezing at seven AMSeventy-three at two-forty PM

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Postscript, Wednesday, January 13, 2016: Beautiful afternoon; finished filling the Garden Tower. FYI: The “coir” bricks were soaked in rain water. I’ve found that plants thrive on rain water so I collect… in two large rain barrels.

Filled two more traysSoaking three more bricks

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Filled three more traysAdded zip ties

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All trays are full of soilTime and temperature at three-sixteen

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Finished project (2)Full to the top and cap on compost tube

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Temperature at three-twenty-fiveTemporary location

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Rain barrels and mosquito plants

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