One very happy Tower gardener !!

Lots of pictures documenting a project that complements my Garden Tower.

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Letter C green with eyes
calculate

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Letter A with eyes and arms
articulate

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Letter R blue with eyes
recruit

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Letter E purple with eyes
execute

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Strong young manDigging the holw

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Rock added to holeExcavated area with rock base

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Cement paving blocksIMHO, our health needs a “good food” foundation. Likewise, my Garden Tower needs a firm foundation. The southeast corner of my site is the only location with beneficial sunshine. FYI: Smooth cement because my Tower (full of soil) did not roll well on cement paving blocks. (See my 12”x 18”x 2” patio paving blocks?)

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My extra busy, extremely talented, handyman arrived about three-ten. I’m so grateful for his help!! “We” worked until dark!! 

Temperature at three-fourteenSixteen bags of concrete

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Starting rebarRebar

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Wire connecting rebarFraming (1)

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Framing (2)Starting to mix concrete

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Mixing concreteDavid is so strong

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One wheelbarrow to haul bags; one wheelbarrow to mix concreteDavid mixing concrete in the wheelbarrow

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David smoothing the concreteFive bags too many

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Smoothing the concreteFlash picture of concrete pad

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Temperature almost eight The next morning; looking good

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Smiley face it's a secretThe cost of that little patch of concrete will remain a secret. I’m eager to roll my Garden Tower into the sunshine of that corner of my site. A blessing (or a curse?); my yard is very shady.

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Form was removedCelebrate with me?! The form was removed; fill dirt and rocks around the edges. ~~ Five large cement blocks were picked-up and laid-down so level and straight. I’ll need all this space for veggie planters.

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Getting ready to reposition five blocksChipping away old cement

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Setting large cement blocksSetting five big blocks

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Foundation for my veggie plantersReady for Garden Tower

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Hallelujah!!
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The object of my affectionGarden Tower and tomato planter

Busy productive day in the garden !!

Nasturtiums plantedTransplanted Rutger's tomato

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Pepper seeds plantedAs stated previously, planting by the moon!! Time to plant “above ground” produce seeds, and transplant “above ground” produce seedlings.

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Aspabroc seeds planted (1)Aspabroc seed planted (2)

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Cucumber seeds plantedBleached planters

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Before planter & caster dolly attachedPlanter attached to caster dolly

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More seeds arrived in the mailBecause I have a wide variety of heirloom seeds, and I’m eager to experiment, I’m sorting through my extensive collection of garden paraphernalia. (I’d forgotten about that caster dolly.) ~~ I read the garden catalogs and see things I’d like **but** so expensive!! I’ll improvise, thank you!! Example of so expensive.”

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Postscript, Thursday, March 17, 2016: I failed to comment I transplanted marigolds into planters with veggies. Here’s a brief quote from a long article titled Ten Multipurpose Plants for Companion Planting.

Usually when we talk about companion planting, we’re talking about planting flowers among our vegetables for their benefits—for example, planting marigolds among the vegetables to help deter aphids. On our farm, we’ve used this concept in our vegetable garden for years with varying levels of success. And while I love the beauty of flowers among my vegetables, a few years in I began to feel like I was missing something.

50 Gardening Tips

Number fifty
Fifty-plus gardening tips.

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Just a few, of many; click this fifty-plus link:

SAVE THOSE COFFEE GROUNDS: Coffee grounds make an excellent addition to compost bins, and they can also be used as a direct mulch or side dressing for nitrogen-hungry crops such as tomatoes and squash. Don’t layer too much coffee straight into beds, however, as it could lead to mold growth. Many local coffee shops will give you their excess coffee grounds for free if you’re trying to cover a large area.

COLLECT TEA BAGS: Like coffee grounds, tea bags can make an excellent addition to your compost pile. Many gardeners say leftover tea and tea bags are especially helpful with azalea plants.

ADD EGGSHELLS: Crushed eggshells have been used for years to encourage plants to grow big and healthy. Simply crush them up and add them around your plants’ root base, or add them to the compost pile.

MAKE YOUR OWN INSECTICIDE: To make your own effective, DIY insecticide, simply mix 1 tablespoon of liquid soap with 1 gallon of water. Pour it into a spray bottle and spray on plants’ leaves and stems. This will help repel pests such as aphids and spider mites. Be sure to reapply after it rains.

PLANT MARIGOLDS: For years, gardeners have planted marigolds near tomato plants to keep bad bugs away. There’s some controversy as to whether this is actually true or not, but who cares? It adds color and beauty to the garden.

WATER IN THE MORNING: This seems obvious, but many people still don’t follow this advice. Morning is by far the most efficient time to water, as less moisture evaporates from the heat. If you do only a few things on this list, make this one of them.

KEEP A GARDEN JOURNAL: Even if you don’t keep a journal every year, try keeping one for a year or two. Write down details such as which varieties you chose and how well they did; when the last day of frost was in your area; when certain plants emerged; what plants had pest problems; and other tidbits like this. It’ll help you plan more efficiently in future years.

MAKE MISTAKES: Everyone should experience a little trial-and-error. It’s part of being a gardener. So be adventurous and push the limits in your own backyard to discover your next favorite plant.

GROW WITH LOVE: Here’s a quote from one of our Facebook readers, passed down for generations in her family. We think it’s excellent advice to follow. “What you seed with love and nurture with love will grow with love.”